Boeing’s New Quality Transformation Program: Will It Fly?

Boeing’s New Quality Transformation Program: Will It Fly?

February 19, 2019

Will Boeing’s new “Quality Transformation” program fly?

Boeing is revamping quality inspection processes and plans to eliminate up to 900 quality inspector jobs over the next two years.  The plan involves mechanics doing more checks of their own work, rather than using inspectors to verify accuracy.  In addition, automated processes or tools make mechanics’ work simpler, more accurate, and faster, further reducing the number of inspections needed.  Another key to the program is using sampling rather than inspecting every job for accuracy.

In December, however, Boeing’s sampling process indicated that one job category failed to meet its 95% standard, with only 93% of the sampled tasks being done correctly. Additionally, some unionized quality inspectors are concerned that quality is being compromised and that Boeing may be pressuring inspectors to make it look like the new processes are doing the job even if they aren’t.

This post is based on the Seattle Times article, Boeing’s move toward fewer inspectors is questioned following quality control audit, by Dominic Gates, February 1, 2019; and the Herald Net article, Boeing revamps quality control: More high tech, fewer humans, also by Dominic Gates, January 22, 2019. Image source: Monty Rakusen/Getty Continue reading

Facebook
Twitter
Third Romaine Recall Hits Trucking Industry

Third Romaine Recall Hits Trucking Industry

January 13, 2019

What do truckers do when told to dump 15 truckloads of lettuce two days before Thanksgiving?

Massive disruptions to the transport of potentially tainted romaine lettuce occurred as 43 people in 12 states were sickened by a particularly dangerous strain of E. coli.  This was the third such crisis to hit the romaine industry within the last 12 months.

Truckers working with Allen Lund Company eventually dumped tons of lettuce in landfills and dumps.  Because the CDC could not immediately track the source of the contaminated lettuce, both retailers and truckers tossed out the good with the bad.

Eventually, the tainted romaine was traced to growers on the central California coast, but only after lettuce from many other places was thrown out or pulled from store shelves.  In the meantime, the price for alternate varieties of lettuce rose quickly, as lettuce supplies contracted and many consumers looked for alternative greens.


Video Spotlight: Lettuce is Twice as Expensive, Thanks to Romaine E. coli Outbreak


This post is based on the Transport Topics article, Romaine Recall Causes Disruption in Trucking Industry, by Jim Stinson, December 3, 2018; and the Cooking Light video, Lettuce is Twice as Expensive, Thanks Continue reading

Facebook
Twitter