Google Shifts Pixel Production to Vietnam

Google Shifts Pixel Production to Vietnam

September 22, 2019

Google, likely in partnership with Foxconn, is moving aggressively to relocate production from China to a former Nokia factory in northern Vietnam.

The factory will cover mid-range Pixel smartphones and other hardware for the U.S. market.   This re-positioning of its supply chain reflects the ongoing tariff war between the U.S. and China and an attempt to lower costs.

China is not being abandoned entirely.  Production will remain there for the Chinese market as well as initial runs of new products.  Further, product development remains in China.

Despite a market slowdown, Google is a success story with expectations to ship 8 – 10 million phones this year, nearly 2x the prior year.  Moving production out of China is part of a wider tech trend to diversify supply chains as the tariff war is hurting profits.


Video Spotlight: Vietnam woos smartphone makers


This post is based on the Nikkei article, Google to shift Pixel smartphone production from China to Vietnam, by Cheng Ting-Fang and Lauly Li, August 28, 2019, and the YouTube video, Vietnam woos smartphone makers by Scott Heidler, March 2, 2015. Image source: Shutterstock / Jane0606

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Chocolate Companies Lack Traceability on Child Labor

Chocolate Companies Lack Traceability on Child Labor

July 2, 2019

Nearly 20 years have passed since the world’s largest chocolate companies, including Mars, Hershey, and Nestle, promised to reduce or eliminate child labor from their cocoa supply chains.

However, today, there are over two million children working in the cocoa industry in West Africa, where about two-thirds of the world’s cocoa is grown.  Chocolate companies still struggle to trace their supply chains back to the individual farms where cocoa comes from, despite spending large amounts of money to try to improve living conditions, access to education, and farming techniques in the area.

That lack of visibility is what makes it difficult for them to verify that the cocoa they purchase has not been grown or harvested with child labor.


Video Spotlight:


This post is based on the Washington Post article, Cocoa’s child laborers, by Peter Whoriskey and Rachel Siegel, June 5, 2019; and the YouTube videos, The Harsh Realities of Child Laborers in the Cocoa Industry, by Annenberg Media, November 4, 2016, and Tackling child labour on cocoa farms in Ivory Coast, by SABC Digital News, Continue reading

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