Pour a Foamy Mug of Rejected Cereal

Pour a Foamy Mug of Rejected Cereal

July 6, 2019

Kellogg’s in Manchester, England has teamed up with UK brewery, Seven Bro7thers, to put new “pop” in the beer business.

The two companies are making beer using Rice Krispies and Coco Pops not perfect enough to make it into the cereal box.

As part of its sustainability efforts, Kellogg’s is repurposing misfit rice-based flakes that are too large, too small, overcooked, uncoated, or discolored and that would, in the past, have been used as animal feed.  The cereals replace malted barley in beer recipes.

These beers follow on the heels of a similar partnership which used rejected Corn Flakes to create “Throw Away IPA” in 2018.


Video Spotlight: Kellogg’s is making beer using discarded corn flakes


This post is based on the Independent article, Kellogg’s launches new beers made from Rice Krispies and Coco Pops waste, by Katie O’Malley, June 13, 2019; the Business Green article, Sip, sparkle, and drink: Kellogg’s turns cereal waste into beer, by Toby Hill, June 13, 2019 (requires a subscription); and the Facebook video, Kellogg’s is making beer using discarded corn flakes, by NowThis Food, December 18, 2019. Image source: Shutterstock / Y_L

Discussion Questions:

1. Why is Kellogg’s Continue reading

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New Player in Food Blockchain

New Player in Food Blockchain

January 27, 2019

The World Wildlife Fund-Australia has distributed a supply chain tool using blockchain that can help make tracking of food items transparent.  The tool uses QR codes that are distributed to client corporations to facilitate tracking.


Video Spotlight: Bait to Plate: Using Blockchain in the Tuna Industry


This post is based on the Coin Telegraph article, WWF Launches Blockchain Tool to Track Food Along Supply Chain, by William Suberg, January 17, 2019; and the YouTube video, Bait-to-Plate: Using Blockchain in the Tuna Industry, by WWF-Australia, July 31, 2018. Image source: Westend61/Getty Images.

Discussion Questions:

1. How does this supply chain tool for WWF-Australia promote social responsibility for corporations that choose to participate? How does this encourage non-participating firms to join the WWF-Australia supply chain tool?

Guidance: The first part of the question is to stimulate a review of the Triple Bottom Line.  The challenge will be focused on the second question posed.  Ask students to consider what pressures a non-participating firm may face in the long run, assuming the QR system becomes more commonly accepted by major food suppliers.  How else can non-participating firms be encouraged to participate in this system?  Are there Continue reading

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Can Blockchain Break the Chains of Forced Labor?

Can Blockchain Break the Chains of Forced Labor?

April 8, 2018

In a previous post, we discussed blockchain’s use in the food supply chain to speed up tracking. Now it’s being used for responsible sourcing.

Can blockchain technology address the use of forced labor in countries that produce sugar cane?

Around 45 million individuals are in forced labor conditions worldwide, according to the International Labor Organization.  Many food and beverage companies are under pressure to eliminate forced labor.

In the U.S. State Department’s first major project to use blockchain for a social issue, it is working with Coca Cola to address this issue in its sugar cane supply chain.

The thought is that the transparency of blockchain may reduce the use of forced labor.  In and of itself, this technology won’t prevent unethical labor practices, but it could provide a chain of evidence for Coca Cola to document responsible sourcing of its sugar cane.

This post is based on the Reuters article, Coca-Cola, U.S. State Dept To Use Blockchain To Combat Forced Labor, by Gertrude Chavez-Dreyfuss, March 16, 2018. Image sources: Shutterstock / heromen30 and Shutterstock / DR MANAGER.

Discussion Questions

1. How important is the responsible sourcing of materials?

Guidance:  It is increasingly important. Continue reading

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