Flippy the Fry Cook

Flippy the Fry Cook

March 1, 2020

The new and improved Flippy the robotic fry cook will probably see greater implementation.  Its price has been cut in half, bringing it down to $30,000, while improved capabilities give it more versatility.  Specifically, Flippy’s programming has been upgraded as part of this improved flexibility.  Flippy utilizes AI to manage its tasks.  Flippy has already been used at Caliburger’s Pasadena restaurant, at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, and at Chase Field in Arizona.

Creator’s hamburger robot takes a different approach.  Creator’s goal is to make a gourmet burger that would be affordable, making it available to a large audience.  Using quality ingredients, the company is aiming for the $6 price point.

Creator has built into this robot processes and techniques that differentiate its burger from the vast majority of fast casual restaurants.  For example, it uses the Blumenthal method of making burgers.  This method uses a vertical grind method for the meat that creates an extremely tender and juicy hamburger.  Most chefs find this technique very difficult, and is not used in fast casual restaurants.  Creator’s robot has perfected this method.  Additionally, the robot slices many of the ingredients, Continue reading

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Robots Are Real in Strawberry Fields

Robots Are Real in Strawberry Fields

Picking delicate fruit such as berries has long been off-limits for robots. Not any longer if Harvest CROO Robotics succeeds in automating this process.

Its robots with a “gentle touch” are touted to make up for a declining work force and ensure the long-term affordability of produce. Currently, both unions and farmers seem to embrace the new technology.


Video Spotlight: See the Harvest robot at work


This post is based on the Washington Post article, Farmworker vs Robot, by D. Paquette, February 17, 2019, and the YouTube video, Gary Wishnatzki of Harvest CROO Robotics, by Harvest CROO, November 6, 2018. Image source: PKKoala/Shutterstock

Discussion Questions:

1. What are the external factors providing opportunities for Harvest?

Guidance: Political/legal (tighter immigration policies) and economic factors (shrinking American labor pool) raise the prospects of much higher prices for produce if automation does not replace human labor. Technological factors (advances in robotics) help Harvest equip farmers with the necessary tools to make up for labor shortages and improve productivity since robots do not take breaks and do not need benefits.

2. What are the foreseeable limitations of the technology in the short term?

Guidance: Currently, the robots still lag Continue reading

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