Aryballe’s Artificial Nose: Smell The Quality

Aryballe’s Artificial Nose: Smell The Quality

August 13, 2018

The artificial nose, developed by French company Aryballe Technologies, can help manufacturers with quality control and new product development.  This bio-optic smell sensor tests the flavor and fragrance of food.

Human noses will still be needed, but this technology adds efficiency.  In product development, when testing how food aromas change over time, it provides clear points of reference, which is difficult for a human to do.  Testing foods for consistency during the manufacturing process can be assisted with this device as well.


Video spotlightAryballe’s ‘artificial nose’ with bio-sensors can boost quality control and NPD


This post is based on the Food Navigator article and video, Aryballe’s ‘artificial nose’ with bio-sensors can boost quality control and NPD, by Niamh Michail, August 2, 2018. Image source: Ingram Publishing/SuperStock.

Discussion Questions:

1. How can this new technology benefit manufacturers and play a role in quality control?

Guidance: From raw material sourcing to finished goods, the artificial nose can help ensure batch-to-batch consistency.  This is referred to as quality of conformance.  Manufacturers need to make sure that each batch of product conforms to the specifications developed in the prototype.  Flavor is one component Continue reading

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3D-Printed Bike Reduces Design Time to Days

3D-Printed Bike Reduces Design Time to Days

July 30, 2018

A start-up company called Arevo is pioneering an environmentally friendly 3D printing process.

3D printing with carbon fiber has not produced a recyclable product…until now. Arevo’s new process incorporates thermoplastic with carbon to make the process and printed product recyclable.

Currently, Arevo is using the new process to print bikes.  The company has designed software that can be used to test the design before printing which further saves energy, materials and time.  The result is that the typical time frame for designing a new bike can be reduced from 18 months to 18 days.


Video spotlight: An Arevo printed bike in action


This post is based on the Fast Company article, Now you can 3D print an entire bike frame, by Adele Peters, July 12, 2018, and the YouTube video, Arevo 3D printing demonstration with bike prototype, by Robotics Business Review, July 12, 2018. Image source: Tomacco/Getty Images.

Discussion Questions:

1. How could Arevo’s 3D printer change the current bike supply chain?

Guidance: The current supply chain involves mainly manufacturing bikes in China and subsequent distribution globally.  Students should be asked to draw the current supply chain, e.g. suppliers sending materials to China, Continue reading

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