Stable Workforce Scheduling Can Improve Worker Health and Performance

Stable Workforce Scheduling Can Improve Worker Health and Performance

March 9, 2019

The service sector faces tremendous fluctuations in demand for their services, as well as low profit margins.  As a result, staffing in the service industry may employ a Just-In-Time (JIT) staffing approach.  In other words, wait until the last moment to call in employees.

This JIT approach results in short notice of an upcoming shift, cancellation of work at the last moment, and variable hours.

Therefore, working in the service sector in many cases means low pay and few fringe benefits, but it may also mean unstable schedules because workers have little control of their work hours.

The consequence of JIT employee scheduling are unhappy workers with poor sleep quality.  Findings have shown that stabilizing employee schedules leads to increases in sales and worker productivity.


Video Spotlight: Philly workers share why they need a fair workweek


This post is based on The Hill article, For job quality, time is more than money, by Daniel Schneider and Kristen Harknett, February 1, 2019; the Work Life Law report,  Stable Scheduling Increases Productivity and Sales: The Stable Scheduling Study by Joan C. Williams, Susan J. Lambert, and Saravanan Kesavan, 2018; and the YouTube video, Philly workers share Continue reading

Facebook
Twitter
New buzz on drones

New buzz on drones

February 17, 2019

What’s all the buzz about bees?

“Dropcopter” drones mimic bees in California and New York, delivering pollen to apples, almonds, and cherry orchards from ten feet above the trees.

Precise timing and delivery of vital pollens led to 25 to 50 percent increases in yields as well as superior fruit in the first three years of testing.  Whereas bees may opt out of night assignments or stay in when the weather is too cold, Dropcopter drones work at the whim of their operators, pollinating 30 to 40 acres per hour in 25 to 30 minute shifts.

Meanwhile, Australia-based Bee Innovative wants to partner with drone experts in North Dakota to upgrade the drones it uses with its bee tracking technology.

“BeeDar” can track bees as they fly and has bee recognition software to identify types of bees as well as bee disease.  Learning more about how weather and terrain influence bee activity could, the company believes, increase crop yields in the future.


Video Spotlight: Drone pollinates Central New York apple orchard


This post is based on the AOPA article, Drones Deliver Pollen, Better Fruit, by Zach Ryall, January 7, 2019; the MPR News article, Company looks to Continue reading

Facebook
Twitter