Microchipping Opens Doors for Employees

Microchipping Opens Doors for Employees

September 23, 2018

Three Square Market, which implanted 100 employees with microchips last year to open doors, log into computers, or buy snacks from vending machines, is working on a new microchip with GPS tracking capability and voice activation. This chip can also monitor vital signs and in the future, applications could involve storing medical records for use in emergency situations.

The microchip is the size of a grain of rice and is implanted in the hand between the thumb and forefinger.  Some are concerned with privacy issues, but some are embracing the technology, including about 4,000 users in Sweden who can ride trains without tickets or turn on lights in their apartments.

How far this will go is yet to be seen, but many believe the technology will become widespread.


Video Spotlights: Wisconsin business chips employees and This is what it feels like to get microchipped


This post is based on the Washington Post article, This firm already microchips employees. Could your ailing relative be next?, by Peter Holley, August 23, 2018; and the videos, Wisconsin company implanting chips in employees, by CNBC, July 27, 2017, and This is what it feels like to get microchipped, by Continue reading

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Trucker shortages affecting supply chains

Trucker shortages affecting supply chains

July 19, 2018

OM in the News has previously posted about the national trucker shortage. The saga continues, and looks to worsen: there are 63,000 positions unfilled this year, and the number is expected to more than double in the future.

This is a challenging problem, especially since almost every item that is sold in the U.S. is transported by truck at some point.  Trucking companies are raising wages to the $60,000 – $70,000 range, with full benefits and signing bonuses, even for new trucking school graduates.  Those ready to work are snapped up quickly.

The dangerous and demanding nature of trucking makes it difficult to attract qualified workers despite the promise of generous compensation.  Rising wages are being passed along to consumers as transportation costs increase distribution costs and force companies to raise prices.

Delivery delays have become common, affecting inventory management and product availability.

This post is based on the Washington Post article, America’s severe trucker shortage could undermine the prosperous economy, by Heather Long, June 28, 2018. Image source: Rouzes/Getty Images.

Discussion Questions:

1. How does the trucking shortage impact manufacturers or other businesses?

Guidance: Trucker shortages mean businesses are finding it difficult to find Continue reading

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