Edible Bar Codes on Beef: It’s What’s For Dinner

Edible Bar Codes on Beef: It’s What’s For Dinner

September 29, 2018

Soon you can aim your smart-phone at a piece of beef and have an app display the meat’s entire history, such as where it was raised, what it was fed, and when and where it was processed.

A new electronic etching procedure developed by Pricewaterhouse Coopers creates an invisible, edible barcode made of non-toxic silicon dioxide.  At first, tags will be embedded in the beef’s primary packaging only, but eventually even individual steaks could be tagged.

The technology will be launched first in Australia and China in the upcoming year.  Such measures will help protect branded names for beef as well as keep food supplies safer for consumers, using the new technology to avoid repeats of multiple past food fraud incidents.

This post is based on the Herald Scotland article, Rog Wood: Hi-tech ways to tell us where our food comes from , by Rog Wood, September 3, 2018; and the Telegraph article, Fake steaks to be exposed by invisible barcode scannable on smart-phones, by Henry Bodkin, August 13, 2018. Image source: Image Source/GIPhotoStock.

Discussion Questions:

1. How will the use of invisible barcodes make the supply chain for meat more transparent?

Guidance: In Continue reading

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Microchipping Opens Doors for Employees

Microchipping Opens Doors for Employees

September 23, 2018

Three Square Market, which implanted 100 employees with microchips last year to open doors, log into computers, or buy snacks from vending machines, is working on a new microchip with GPS tracking capability and voice activation. This chip can also monitor vital signs and in the future, applications could involve storing medical records for use in emergency situations.

The microchip is the size of a grain of rice and is implanted in the hand between the thumb and forefinger.  Some are concerned with privacy issues, but some are embracing the technology, including about 4,000 users in Sweden who can ride trains without tickets or turn on lights in their apartments.

How far this will go is yet to be seen, but many believe the technology will become widespread.


Video Spotlights: Wisconsin business chips employees and This is what it feels like to get microchipped


This post is based on the Washington Post article, This firm already microchips employees. Could your ailing relative be next?, by Peter Holley, August 23, 2018; and the videos, Wisconsin company implanting chips in employees, by CNBC, July 27, 2017, and This is what it feels like to get microchipped, by Continue reading

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