Aryballe’s Artificial Nose: Smell The Quality

Aryballe’s Artificial Nose: Smell The Quality

August 13, 2018

The artificial nose, developed by French company Aryballe Technologies, can help manufacturers with quality control and new product development.  This bio-optic smell sensor tests the flavor and fragrance of food.

Human noses will still be needed, but this technology adds efficiency.  In product development, when testing how food aromas change over time, it provides clear points of reference, which is difficult for a human to do.  Testing foods for consistency during the manufacturing process can be assisted with this device as well.


Video spotlightAryballe’s ‘artificial nose’ with bio-sensors can boost quality control and NPD


This post is based on the Food Navigator article and video, Aryballe’s ‘artificial nose’ with bio-sensors can boost quality control and NPD, by Niamh Michail, August 2, 2018. Image source: Ingram Publishing/SuperStock.

Discussion Questions:

1. How can this new technology benefit manufacturers and play a role in quality control?

Guidance: From raw material sourcing to finished goods, the artificial nose can help ensure batch-to-batch consistency.  This is referred to as quality of conformance.  Manufacturers need to make sure that each batch of product conforms to the specifications developed in the prototype.  Flavor is one component Continue reading

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Fast Fashion Presents Design Problems

Fast Fashion Presents Design Problems

July 30, 2018

Fast fashion retailers, such as Zara, H&M, Topshop, and Urban Outfitters, compete by getting new designs to the marketplace as quickly as possible.  For example, Zara develops around 20,000 designs per year.

Such speed occasionally leads to fast fashion faux pas.

Some of the most notable include:

  • Zara’s miniskirt with a character resembling Pepe the Frog, a symbol used by white supremacists
  • H&M ran an ad of a black child wearing a sweatshirt that said “Coolest monkey in the jungle”
  • Urban Outfitter’s sold a red-stained Kent State Sweatshirt as part of its vintage collection

And while not the fault of the designer, sometimes these companies end up in the news because of the circumstances in which their clothing is displayed. Recently, Melania Trump wore a Zara jacket with the words “I really don’t care, do u?” as she traveled to visit immigrant children who had been separated from their parents.

This post is based on the Washington Post article, Fast Fashion, Furious Controversy: Why Retailers Like Zara and H&M Keep Making Headlines for Offensive Clothing, by Abha Bhattarai, June 29, 2018. Image source: © Floresco Productions / age fotostock.

Discussion Questions:

1. Why is fast design important?

Guidance Continue reading

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