Trending but Illegal? FDA Hearings on CBD-Infused Foods

Trending but Illegal? FDA Hearings on CBD-Infused Foods

March 20, 2019

CBD, the non-psychoactive compound derived from cannabis plants, was dubbed the top culinary trend of 2019 in a recent survey of chefs conducted by the National Restaurant Association.

CBD-infused food and beverages ranging from brownies to lattes to fruity teas are all the rage.  Proponents tout benefits such as reduced anxiety, lessened pain, and fewer seizures, as well as other calming benefits for the body.

Last year’s legalization of the industrial production of hemp opened the door for increased supply, but the FDA has not yet cleared the way for the use of CBD in food and beverages.  Meanwhile, a complex web of state and local laws confuse hemp farmers and food and beverage manufacturers alike.

The FDA will begin the public hearing process in April, which is viewed as the first step in creating rules for CBD’s legal use in the food and beverage industry.  Many businesses, however, are already illegally selling products to eager consumers.


Video Spotlight: CBD-infused foods become rising trend in 2019


This post is based on the SmartBrief article, Recent crackdowns muddy the waters around CBD in food and beverages, by Tricia Contreras, March 4, 2019; the CNBC article, Continue reading

Facebook
Twitter
Poaching Constrains Supply of Elvers

Poaching Constrains Supply of Elvers

The supply chain of baby eels, called elvers, is facing tighter controls from Elver Fishery in Maine to Eel Dish in Japan.

The root cause? Illegal poaching.  A pound of elvers goes for more than a thousand dollars.

State law enforcement officers will oversee the weighing, packing and shipping of the eels to ensure elvers are legally harvested from participating fishermen within a quota of 9,688 pounds per fishery.


Video Spotlight: Poaching Threatens Maine’s Eel Fishing Industry


This post is based on the Washington Post article, New controls in Maine to prevent poaching of valuable eels, by Patrick Whittle, February 22, 2019, and the YouTube video, Poaching Threatens Maine’s Eel Fishing Industry, by AP, August 12, 2017. Image source:(c) Erica Simone Leeds

Discussion Questions:

1. Identify the unethical and illegal behaviors spotlighted in Maine’s baby eel supply chain.

Guidance: Examples of unethical and illegal behavior include poaching eels from rivers and streams, exporting poached eels to Asian aquaculture companies, exceeding eels quotas to profit from illegal sales, and tampering with eel shipments to bypass the state’s tracking system. Each of these behaviors is illegal, but student discussion can also focus on ethicality.

2. What steps Continue reading

Facebook
Twitter