Dreamliners Face Another Quality Nightmare

Dreamliners Face Another Quality Nightmare

October 8, 2018

Boeing’s 787 jetliners have been grounded for emergency repairs due to defective engine blades made by Rolls-Royce Holding PLC.

Rolls-Royce discovered that the Trent 1000 turbines in the 787 engine were “deteriorating faster than expected” when an Air New Zealand jet experienced engine problems in December 2017.

The projected cost for Rolls-Royce to fix design faults with its engine blades and replace affected parts is $1.3 billion.

This post is based on the Industry Week article, Dreamliners Are Being Grounded Again on Rolls-Royce Engine Flaws, by Benjamin Katz, September 27, 2018. Image source: (c) 77studio/Getty Images.

Discussion Questions:

1. What kind of engine design improvements should Boeing expect from Rolls-Royce in the future?

Guidance: Boeing should expect Rolls-Royce to improve the engine’s design reliability and robustness to deliver an engine that is durable, serviceable, and also consistent in performance and quality.

2. What can Rolls-Royce do to improve the quality of engines that it produces?

Guidance: Rolls-Royce should consider its engine’s quality costs including appraisal, prevention, and failure costs.  It should also employ six sigma methodology for process improvement in its engine production.

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Fast Fashion Presents Design Problems

Fast Fashion Presents Design Problems

July 30, 2018

Fast fashion retailers, such as Zara, H&M, Topshop, and Urban Outfitters, compete by getting new designs to the marketplace as quickly as possible.  For example, Zara develops around 20,000 designs per year.

Such speed occasionally leads to fast fashion faux pas.

Some of the most notable include:

  • Zara’s miniskirt with a character resembling Pepe the Frog, a symbol used by white supremacists
  • H&M ran an ad of a black child wearing a sweatshirt that said “Coolest monkey in the jungle”
  • Urban Outfitter’s sold a red-stained Kent State Sweatshirt as part of its vintage collection

And while not the fault of the designer, sometimes these companies end up in the news because of the circumstances in which their clothing is displayed. Recently, Melania Trump wore a Zara jacket with the words “I really don’t care, do u?” as she traveled to visit immigrant children who had been separated from their parents.

This post is based on the Washington Post article, Fast Fashion, Furious Controversy: Why Retailers Like Zara and H&M Keep Making Headlines for Offensive Clothing, by Abha Bhattarai, June 29, 2018. Image source: © Floresco Productions / age fotostock.

Discussion Questions:

1. Why is fast design important?

Guidance Continue reading

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