Boeing’s New Quality Transformation Program: Will It Fly?

Boeing’s New Quality Transformation Program: Will It Fly?

February 19, 2019

Will Boeing’s new “Quality Transformation” program fly?

Boeing is revamping quality inspection processes and plans to eliminate up to 900 quality inspector jobs over the next two years.  The plan involves mechanics doing more checks of their own work, rather than using inspectors to verify accuracy.  In addition, automated processes or tools make mechanics’ work simpler, more accurate, and faster, further reducing the number of inspections needed.  Another key to the program is using sampling rather than inspecting every job for accuracy.

In December, however, Boeing’s sampling process indicated that one job category failed to meet its 95% standard, with only 93% of the sampled tasks being done correctly. Additionally, some unionized quality inspectors are concerned that quality is being compromised and that Boeing may be pressuring inspectors to make it look like the new processes are doing the job even if they aren’t.

This post is based on the Seattle Times article, Boeing’s move toward fewer inspectors is questioned following quality control audit, by Dominic Gates, February 1, 2019; and the Herald Net article, Boeing revamps quality control: More high tech, fewer humans, also by Dominic Gates, January 22, 2019. Image source: Monty Rakusen/Getty Continue reading

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New buzz on drones

New buzz on drones

February 17, 2019

What’s all the buzz about bees?

“Dropcopter” drones mimic bees in California and New York, delivering pollen to apples, almonds, and cherry orchards from ten feet above the trees.

Precise timing and delivery of vital pollens led to 25 to 50 percent increases in yields as well as superior fruit in the first three years of testing.  Whereas bees may opt out of night assignments or stay in when the weather is too cold, Dropcopter drones work at the whim of their operators, pollinating 30 to 40 acres per hour in 25 to 30 minute shifts.

Meanwhile, Australia-based Bee Innovative wants to partner with drone experts in North Dakota to upgrade the drones it uses with its bee tracking technology.

“BeeDar” can track bees as they fly and has bee recognition software to identify types of bees as well as bee disease.  Learning more about how weather and terrain influence bee activity could, the company believes, increase crop yields in the future.


Video Spotlight: Drone pollinates Central New York apple orchard


This post is based on the AOPA article, Drones Deliver Pollen, Better Fruit, by Zach Ryall, January 7, 2019; the MPR News article, Company looks to Continue reading

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