Safety, Ethics and Vaping

Safety, Ethics and Vaping

October 19, 2019

Fruity flavors that sound like childhood candy favorites have lured many teens into vaping. Highly addictive nicotine vaping products have drawn in 3.6 million young users, many of whom find themselves hooked and unable to quit.

After a 2016 FDA ruling on the products, sales for Juul e-cigarettes, for instance, increased over 600%, and the trend of declining youth smoking was reversed.

In addition to long-term effects of vaping, some e-liquid flavors, like cinnamon, cotton candy, and bubble gum, are poisonous in high doses.  Recently, the CDC has linked 1299 lung injury cases and 26 deaths to vaping THC, the component in marijuana that delivers a high.  Twenty percent of the deaths were in users 18 to 20 years old.


Video Spotlight: Teens falling victim to the JUUL effect


This post is based on the LA Times article, The FDA tried to ban flavors years before the vaping outbreak. Top Obama officials rejected the plan, by Emily Baumgaertner, October 1, 2019; the USA Today article, Vaping-related lung injury cases jump to 1,299; deaths rise to 26, by Doug Stanglin, October 10, 2019; and the YouTube video, Teens falling victim to the JUUL effect, Continue reading

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Who Let the Dogs Out?

Who Let the Dogs Out?

Like many other start-ups, Wag has been overwhelmed by its own success.

Wag is a dog-walking service that, like Uber, links pet owners and a network of walkers online. Launched in 2015, it seemed poised for rapid growth, especially after benefiting from an enormous injection of capital. However, growing pains started hurting the company, and it lost market share. Former employees put some of the blame on new management for failing to understand the company and develop a sound strategy.


Video Spotlight: Wag Dog Walking Review


This post is based on the CNN.com article, Dog-Walking Startup Wag Raised $300 million to Unleash Growth. Then Things Got Messy, by S.A. O’Brien, September 27, 2019, and the YouTube video, Wag Dog Walking Review – Wag App Reviewby Red Pill Vegan, June 8, 2018. Image source: Brand X Pictures/Getty Images

Discussion Questions:

1. What is Wag’s core business? Is the direction taken by top management consistent with the core business?

Guidance: Wag’s core business is taking the best care of people’s pets. Top management’s primary concerns seem to have shifted from a love for dogs to market growth with more walkers, centralized operations, and cost reductions. The Continue reading

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Pour a Foamy Mug of Rejected Cereal

Pour a Foamy Mug of Rejected Cereal

July 6, 2019

Kellogg’s in Manchester, England has teamed up with UK brewery, Seven Bro7thers, to put new “pop” in the beer business.

The two companies are making beer using Rice Krispies and Coco Pops not perfect enough to make it into the cereal box.

As part of its sustainability efforts, Kellogg’s is repurposing misfit rice-based flakes that are too large, too small, overcooked, uncoated, or discolored and that would, in the past, have been used as animal feed.  The cereals replace malted barley in beer recipes.

These beers follow on the heels of a similar partnership which used rejected Corn Flakes to create “Throw Away IPA” in 2018.


Video Spotlight: Kellogg’s is making beer using discarded corn flakes


This post is based on the Independent article, Kellogg’s launches new beers made from Rice Krispies and Coco Pops waste, by Katie O’Malley, June 13, 2019; the Business Green article, Sip, sparkle, and drink: Kellogg’s turns cereal waste into beer, by Toby Hill, June 13, 2019 (requires a subscription); and the Facebook video, Kellogg’s is making beer using discarded corn flakes, by NowThis Food, December 18, 2019. Image source: Shutterstock / Y_L

Discussion Questions:

1. Why is Kellogg’s Continue reading

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